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Rahmi Öğdül - İmgenin Kudreti

The Image in the Cave

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Why did humans feel the need to produce visual images? Accompanied by James David Lewis’s book “The Mind in the Cave,” we will discuss the images drawn on the dark surfaces of caves 40 00 years ago and the relations among those who produced these images. Do images determine lives, or do lives determine images?

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Rahmi Öğdül - İmgenin Kudreti

The Unreliable Image

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The issue of the unreliability of the image as a representation has occupied the minds of thinkers since Plato. The thoughts of Plato, Aristotle, and Platinos on the image and the traces of these ideas in modern times will be discussed in the context of the visual arts.

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Rahmi Öğdül - İmgenin Kudreti

Image Regimes

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Images have their order, and each historical period differs from others not only by the images produced but also by how those images relate to each other. We will discuss the visual regimes in which images were established in the Renaissance, Baroque and modern periods.

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Rahmi Öğdül - İmgenin Kudreti

The Violence of the Image

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The image has always exerted violence on bodies and minds as a formative force. But this violence has become a bombardment of images today, and we are trying to survive despite the images. Images do not unite anymore; our world of meaning is becoming increasingly fragmented with the addition of new images to our lives. Images that have become disembodied with today’s digitalization force us to become disembodied.

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Oğuz Karayemiş - Felsefeye Giriş Seminerleri

What is philosophy?

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This week we will consider the conditions that accompany each (re)birth of philosophy. Among these conditions are necessary conditions such as “taking distance from the already established with common sense and reason” and “love for criticism and independent reasoning,” which bring philosophy and art closer together. Other conditions include “thinking with concepts / creating concepts,” giving philosophy its autonomy and specificity in the face of other forces of thought. In this respect, we will talk about distinguishing philosophy from science and art while distinguishing it from the “ethos” and the specific “wisdom” of an era and a locale, determined by the community’s general beliefs and forms of knowledge. The birth of philosophy in ancient Greece will be our specific problem that will accompany this week’s discussion.

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Oğuz Karayemiş - Felsefeye Giriş Seminerleri

Philosophical Geography

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This week, we’re going to cover the geographies of philosophy. In particular, we will discuss the various forms of wisdom we encounter under the name of “eastern philosophies” and the relations of religious faiths with philosophy. We will talk about the figures that appear in the forms of wisdom and the tension between these figures and concepts. The “Speech in Praise of Abraham” chapter in Kierkegaard’s book Fear and Trembling will accompany our discussion.

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Oğuz Karayemiş - Felsefeye Giriş Seminerleri

What is concept?

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This week we will take a closer look at the notion of “concept,” which is philosophy’s specific tool and product. We will distinguish concepts from scientific functions and artistic influences that are part of knowledge production. These discussions will lead us to the concept of the “problem.” We will see the specific area covered by problems in philosophy and how philosophical problems work like engines to produce concepts rather than as negative obstacles to philosophy. The “causality problem” discovered or invented by the British philosopher David Hume and the “habit” also created by Hume around this problem, and the “transcendental” concepts created by Immanuel Kant will accompany our discussion.

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Oğuz Karayemiş - Felsefeye Giriş Seminerleri

Procedures of Philosophy

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This week, we will further develop the concept of the problem and formulate philosophical reading and writing procedures within the framework of the practice of problematizing. How could a philosopher’s texts be interpreted in a way so that we readers would both perceive their problems and deepen our own? How could a problematic partnership, neighborhood, and affinity be established with sciences and arts in this sense? The Logic of Sensation by the French philosopher, Gilles Deleuze on the French painter Francis Bacon, will accompany our discussion.

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